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Campo San Aponal in the San Polo sestiere of Venice, Italy. 
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Campo San Aponal in the San Polo sestiere of Venice, Italy.
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Campo de Gheto Novo - the main square of the "original" Ghetto, the Jewish district of Venice, Italy. 
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Campo de Gheto Novo - the main square of the "original" Ghetto, the Jewish district of Venice, Italy.

The Venetian Ghetto was the area of Venice in which Jews were compelled to live under the Venetian Republic. The English term "ghetto" is an Italian loanword, which actually comes from the Venetian word "gheto", slag, and was used in this sense in a reference to a foundry where slag was stored located on the same island as the area of Jewish confinement. An alternative etymology is from Italian borghetto, diminutive of borgo ‘borough’.

The Ghetto is an area of the Cannaregio sestiere of Venice, divided into the Ghetto Nuovo ("New Ghetto"), and the adjacent Ghetto Vecchio ("Old Ghetto"). These names of the ghetto sections are misleading, as they refer to an older and newer site at the time of their use by the foundries: in terms of Jewish residence, the Ghetto Nuovo is actually older than the Ghetto Vecchio. (Text based on Wikipedia).

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A fragment of the Holocaust Memorial by Arbit Blatas, Campo de Gheto Novo, VeniceA fragment of the Holocaust Memorial by Arbit Blatas, Campo de Gheto Novo, VeniceA fragment of the Holocaust Memorial by Arbit Blatas, Campo de Gheto Novo, Venice
Campo San Geremia in the Cannaregio district of Venice. 
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Campo San Geremia in the Cannaregio district of Venice.

Wikipedia: "The nearby Palazzo Labia is known for the remarkable frescoed ballroom painted 1746–47 by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, with decorative works in trompe l'oeil by Gerolamo Mengozzi-Colonna. [...]

The Labia family, who commissioned the palazzo, were originally Spanish and bought their way into nobility in 1646, hence considered arriviste by the old Venetian aristocracy. The wars with the Ottomans had depleted the coffers of the Republic of Venice which then sold inscriptions into nobility, thus giving political clout. It has been said that they compensated their lack of ancestors by a great display of wealth. Today the Palazzo Labia is the sole remaining example of this ostentation. [...]

The wealth and power of the Labia family declined with the fall of the Serene Republic in 1797. During the 19th century the Palazzo fell into decay. This coincided with a period where Tiepolo's work was unpopular and unappreciated. In 1945 a munitions boat exploded close to the palazzo, shattering its already precarious foundations, and causing fragments of the ballroom frescoes to fall to the ground.

In 1948 the palazzo acquired a new owner, Don Carlos de Beistegui (Charlie de Beistegui), French-born heir to a Franco-Mexican fortune, who began an intensive restoration. Beistegui was a skilled natural interior decorator, and for the derelict palazzo, he purchased furnishings acquired from the palazzo's less fortunate neighbours, including frescoes by Raphael, Annibale Carracci, and Guido Reni. These works of art, coupled with newly acquired tapestries and antiques, restored to the palazzo its former splendour. [...]

On 3 September 1951 Don Carlos held a a masquerade ball, Le Bal oriental, at the Palazzo Labia. It was one of the largest and most lavish social events of the 20th century. It launched the career of the Venetian fashion designer Pierre Cardin, who designed about 30 of the costumes worn by members of the "dolce vita" who attended. Christian Dior and Salvador Dalí designed each other's costumes. Cecil Beaton's photographs of the ball display an almost surreal society, reminiscent of the Venetian life immediately before the fall of the republic at the end of the 18th century. The party was to be one of the last truly spectacular events in the famous ballroom.".

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The Fountain of Neptune (Fontana di Nettuno), a monumental civic fountain located in Piazza Nettuno, next to Piazza Maggiore in Bologna, Italy. 
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The Fountain of Neptune (Fontana di Nettuno), a monumental civic fountain located in Piazza Nettuno, next to Piazza Maggiore in Bologna, Italy.

Wikipedia: "Its bronze figure of Neptune, extending his reach in a lordly gesture of stilling and controlling the waters, is an early work of Giambologna's maturity, completed about 1567.

An innovation of Giambologna's fountain designs is the fantastic and non-geometrical forms he gave to the basins into which water splashed and flowed, "curiously folded, bulging and elastic in form", as Rosalind Grippi remarked. The fountain is a model example of Mannerist taste of the courtly elite in the mid-sixteenth century: construction of the statue was commissioned by the Cardinal Legate of the city, Charles Borromeo, to symbolize the fortunate recent election of Borromeo's uncle as Pope Pius IV.

The work was designed by the Palermitan architect Tommaso Laureti in 1563, with an over-lifesize bronze of the god Neptune on the top, executed by Giambologna, who had submitted a model for the fountain of Neptune in Florence, but had lost the commission to Baccio Bandinelli. Before the fountain was built, an entire edifice was demolished to make space for it. The fountain was completed in 1565, and the Neptune was fixed in place within a couple of years".

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Piazza Maggiore, the 13th century main square of Bologna, Italy. 
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Piazza Maggiore, the 13th century main square of Bologna, Italy.

Covered with canvas is the Basilica of San Petronio, the fifth largest church in the world, dedicated to the patron saint of the city.
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
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