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Pizzas for lunch in L'Antica Pizzeria da Michele of Julia Roberts fame in Naples, Italy. 
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Pizzas for lunch in L'Antica Pizzeria da Michele of Julia Roberts fame in Naples, Italy.

"He pressed the address into the palm of my hand and said, in gravest confidence, ‶Please go to this pizzeria. Order the margherita pizza with double mozzarella. If you do not eat this pizza when you are in Naples, please lie to me later and tell me that you did.” [...]

Pizzeria da Michele is a small place with only two rooms and one nonstop oven. It’s about a fifteen-minute walk from the train station in the rain, don’t even worry about it, just go. You need to get there fairly early in the day because sometimes they run out of dough, which will break your heart. By 1:00 PM, the streets outside the pizzeria have become jammed with Neapolitans trying to get into the place, shoving for access like they’re trying to get space on a lifeboat. There’s not a menu. They have only two varieties of pizza here—regular and extra cheese. None of this new age southern California olives-and-sun-dried-tomato wannabe pizza twaddle. The dough, it takes me half my meal to figure out, tastes more like Indian nan than like any pizza dough I ever tried. It’s soft and chewy and yielding, but incredibly thin. I always thought we only had two choices in our lives when it came to pizza crust—thin and crispy, or thick and doughy. How was I to have known there could be a crust in this world that was thin and doughy? Holy of holies! Thin, doughy, strong, gummy, yummy, chewy, salty pizza paradise." (Eat, Pray, Love, 2006).

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Julia Roberts having a slice at Da Michele (Eat Pray Love, Sony Pictures)Pizzeria da Michele, NaplesPizzeria da Michele, NaplesPizzeria da Michele, NaplesPizzeria da Michele, Naples
Piazza Sisto Riario Sforza in the centro storico of Naples, Italy. 
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Piazza Sisto Riario Sforza in the centro storico of Naples, Italy.
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Naples
Inside the Duomo in Naples, Italy. 
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Inside the Duomo in Naples, Italy.

"Naples Cathedral is a Roman Catholic cathedral, the main church of Naples, southern Italy, and the seat of the Archbishop of Naples. It is widely known as the Cattedrale di San Gennaro, in honour of Saint Januarius, the city's patron saint, but is actually dedicated to the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

The present cathedral was commissioned by King Charles I of Anjou. Construction continued during the reign of his successor, Charles II (1285-1309) and was completed in the early 14th century under Robert of Anjou. It was built on the foundations of two palaeo-Christian basilicas, whose traces can still be clearly seen. Underneath the building excavations have revealed Greek and Roman artifacts.

The main attraction of the interior is the Royal Chapel of the Treasure of San Gennaro, with frescoes by Domenichino and Giovanni Lanfranco, altarpieces by Domenichino, Massimo Stanzione and Jusepe Ribera, the rich high altar by Francesco Solimena, the bronze railing by Cosimo Fanzago and other artworks, including a reliquary by 14th century French masters. [...]

The church houses a vial of the blood of Saint Januarius which is brought out twice a year, on the first Saturday in May and on 19 September, when the dried blood usually liquefies. If the blood fails to liquefy, then legend has it that disaster will befall Naples." (Text from Wikipedia).

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In the Naples CathedralIn the Naples Cathedral
Sometimes it rains even in Naples: Piazza del Plebiscito. 
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Sometimes it rains even in Naples: Piazza del Plebiscito.

"Piazza Plebiscito is one of the largest squares in Naples. It is named for the plebiscite taken on October 2 in 1860 that brought Naples into the unified Kingdom of Italy under the House of Savoy. Located very closely to the gulf of Naples, it is bounded on the east by the Royal Palace and on the west by the church of San Francesco di Paola with colonnades extending to both sides.

In the first years of the 19th century, the King of Naples was Murat (Napoleon's brother-in-law). He planned the square and building as a tribute to the emperor. When Napoleon was finally dispatched, the Bourbons were restored to the throne of Naples.

Ferdinand I continued the construction but converted the finished product into the church one sees today. He dedicated it to Saint Francis of Paola, who had stayed in a monastery on this site in the 16th century. The church is reminiscent of the Pantheon in Rome. The façade is fronted by a portico resting on six columns and two Ionic pillars. Inside, the church is circular with two side chapels. The dome is 53 metres high." (Text from Wikipedia).

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Naples: Piazza del Plebiscito
Inside the Galleria Umberto I, a 19th-century shopping gallery in the centre of Naples, Italy. 
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Inside the Galleria Umberto I, a 19th-century shopping gallery in the centre of Naples, Italy.

"It is located directly across from the San Carlo opera house. It was built between 1887–1891, and was the cornerstone in the decades-long rebuilding of Naples — called the risanamento (lit. "making healthy again") — that lasted until World War I. It was designed by Emanuele Rocco, who employed modern architectural elements reminiscent of the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan. The Galleria was named for Umberto I, King of Italy at the time of construction. It was meant to combine businesses, shops, cafes and social life — public space — with private space in the apartments on the third floor.
The Galleria is a high and spacious cross-shaped affair surmounted by a glass dome braced by 16 metal ribs. Of the four glass-vaulted wings, one fronts on via Toledo (via Roma), still the main downtown thoroughfare, and another opens onto the San Carlo Theater. It has returned to being an active center of Neapolitan civic life after years of decay." (Text from Wikipedia).
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
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